Choly Knight

Sew Desu Ne?


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Infographic: Sewing from the Ground Up

Hi everyone! This infographic I just finished up is on a topic that’s near and dear to my heart. I got a few fans that told me they’re excited to start sewing after seeing my free patterns. But they admit they don’t have the money to get started buying supplies, let alone a sewing machine, so they don’t know when they can start. It’s such a bummer that hit me much harder than usual because I know that feeling exactly. I personally started sewing with random supplies I found around the house and a broken old Singer.
So I thought I might share the tiny steps I went through to earn the money I needed to make sewing a serious hobby. And in the hopes to make it a little less boring, I put it in infographic form! But you can find the detailed information after the graphic. I don’t know if it will help a ton of people, but it was still freeing to get to share a little of my history with you all this way ❤

1. ASSESS WHAT YOU’VE GOT:
Lots of lists out there will give you the rundown of what every beginner sewist should have. It’s usually something like: sewing machine, thread, pins, needles, scissors, rulers/measuring tape, seam ripper, iron, fabric marker, and your fabric. Gather what you have from this list. If you have none of it, the bare minimum of what you need is:
Thread, needle, and scissors.
You can usually find sewing kits with a thread assortment, needles, and maybe some tiny scissors. Some kits are as little as $2-3 (USD). It’s not perfect, but it’ll do if you don’t have a lot of funds!
To tackle the rest seriously, you could make a list of the remaining supplies you need and their dollar amounts so you have a clear goal to aim for.
Also, I didn’t know anyone else that sewed when I got started, but if you’re lucky enough that you do, ask around! There’s a very good chance a fellow or former sewist might have some hand-me-down tools and fabric for you.

2. SAVE UP FOR THE REST:
a. Take on odd jobs:
I earned the most of sewing money through my brother, who paid me to attach punk band patches to his clothes, haha 🙂 Taking on little mending projects that people sometimes forget about is a great way to get started. This works the best if you have lots of supportive friends and family that know you’re still learning. Ask if they need any of their clothes fixed. With just thread and a needle, you can handle these sorts of jobs:
Note: I find it doesn’t hurt to ask specific questions, haha 🙂 Many people forget they have a shirt missing a button in the back of their closet, or a collection of patches they meant to add to a jacket, etc.

If you’re lucky enough to start with a sewing machine, you can tackle more difficult jobs:

If you manage to earn $5 here or $10 there for each job, that quickly adds up to lots of tools and fabric!

b. Make projects from recycled items:
If that’s not an option for you, or you want to push your skills further, you can also make items to sell from unused household items.

Items like these can be sold at craft shows, conventions, and bazaars. Or you could take the plunge and open up an online shop like on Etsy or StoreEnvy.

And from there?
Hopefully from this it might help you earn enough to get the sewing machine you wanted, or build up the fabric collection you’ve wished for! You can start buying nicer fabrics and supplies so you can make better things to sell, or just make things for yourself and fall back on these tips when you need more spending money!


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Infographic: Fusible Web Applique

I recently whipped up another infographic! 😀 I wanted to get to this topic much sooner, but I felt I needed to tackle more basic things first.
This one goes over the steps involved in fusible web applique in a fun flowchart form. Applique is probably my favorite technique because of its versatility, so hopefully this chart will show all the possibilities you have when using it depending on the tools and skills you have.
It works much the same way as other flowcharts — you start at the top and answer questions brought up in the gray boxes. From there you follow the arrows based on your answer to get to the next step. While it doesn’t go over exactly how to do all the different stitches, it should still simplify the process as a whole.

I’ve gotten a lot of questions about satin stitching as well, so I hope to tackle that one in an infographic soon too 🙂
In the meantime, I hope this one is helpful!


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Infographic: Plush Sewing Basics Vocabulary

I’ve got another infographic for you all today! I’ve gotten a lot of requests for this one 🙂 It’s an infographic showing the basic terminology and vocabulary you might want to know for plush sewing. It covers a lot of the terms that are thrown around that intermediate and advanced sewers might take for granted that everyone knows. It took all of my determination to keep this concise, haha. I would have loved to go in-depth for every topic, but obviously it’s mean to be a quick, at-a-glance kind of vocab list. With any luck, it might help jog your memory or give you something to work off of the next time a sewing term confuses you!

plush-sewing-vocabulary


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Tutorial: Enlarging and Reducing .pdf Plush Patterns

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Thanks to technology, enlarging & reducing patterns from a digital .pdf document is pretty simple. But if you’re worried about getting the details just right the first time, here are some tips for how to handle it so you can jump right in!

Continue reading


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Plush Sewing Basics Infographic: Starter Tools

I’ve got a new infographic for you all today! I often get people who tell me that they can’t wait to start sewing, but they don’t have any money yet for any of the tools. And I completely sympathize with that notion. I had pretty much nothing when I started sewing. In fact, my mother’s sewing machine broke shortly before I started getting serious about it – I was hand sewing everything for about a year before it was fixed. There are tons of tips and tutorials out there about what to buy when you first start out, but that runs up a pretty big bill. So I created this chart to give you an idea of what cheaper alternatives you can start with – specifically for plush sewing since that’s what most of my newbie fans gravitate towards 😀

In it is a list of everything I think it absolutely necessary to get started, ranked from good to best depending on what you have the cash for. Some of the items you might already have around the house! Where it gets interesting are the items where all 3 options are suggested for purchasing. Use these as a ‘to-buy’ list if you will. They start off with the more basic, general tools and move up to the more specific ones. So when you have the whole set you’ll be able to tackle more complex and detailed projects!

The only other caveat I would remember is that this only lists hardware, not software like fabric, batting, trims, etc. And, like I said, it’s only the absolute basics. You can get into even more complex stuff down the line if you find you want to sew seriously and often.

Plush Sewing Basics: Starter Tools Infographic


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Plush Sewing Basics: Fabric Anatomy & Cutting

Today is a continuation from my previous infographic ❤ This one delves into fabric anatomy and properly cutting fabric for your plush projects. There are lots of other guides out there that overlap what I’ve written here, but it never hurts to be doubly sure, especially since fabrics for plushies (like minky and faux fur), create an extra challenge at times. My patterns up until now assumed that readers knew about fabric grain lines and nap, but with this now I can be much more thorough for those of you starting out!

Cutting Plush Fabric Infographic


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Plush Sewing Basics: Working with Fleece and Minky

Hi everyone!

I’m back with another infographic, getting into the nitty gritty of working with plush fabrics. This one is about general tips and tricks for working with fabrics like fleece and minky. Fleece is generally easy to sew, but this graphic has a few pointers to make it foolproof. There are also tips for working with minky as well, which is known to be a little tricky at times. It also goes into the different types of fleece and minky out there. They’re both fabrics that are popular and trendy right now, so new variations and names are cropping up everywhere. It’s sure to confuse beginners. But I’m going to do my best to clear things up for you here 🙂

Working with Fleece & Minky Infographic