Choly Knight

Sew Desu Ne?

Infographic: Fusible Web Applique

10 Comments

I recently whipped up another infographic! 😀 I wanted to get to this topic much sooner, but I felt I needed to tackle more basic things first.
This one goes over the steps involved in fusible web applique in a fun flowchart form. Applique is probably my favorite technique because of its versatility, so hopefully this chart will show all the possibilities you have when using it depending on the tools and skills you have.
It works much the same way as other flowcharts — you start at the top and answer questions brought up in the gray boxes. From there you follow the arrows based on your answer to get to the next step. While it doesn’t go over exactly how to do all the different stitches, it should still simplify the process as a whole.

I’ve gotten a lot of questions about satin stitching as well, so I hope to tackle that one in an infographic soon too 🙂
In the meantime, I hope this one is helpful!

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10 thoughts on “Infographic: Fusible Web Applique

  1. This is very helpful Choly! Thank you for this. This is really easy to understand.

    BTW, I’ve been meaning to ask; have you made an infographic about choosing the right sewing machine needles? I think (in an estimate) I’ve been breaking my sewing machine needles right after or just before finishing one project (one costume).

    I’ve tried searching about it online and ask friends but they don’t specifically state the numbers of the needles and for what specific fabric would the needle be compatible with.

    Thanks so much for everything you do! ❤

  2. Super helpful! Thank you! ❤

  3. Oh thank you sooooo much for that, I’ve had lots of trouble with applique!
    Although, I’ve had a problem that you don’t seem to experience. I’ve used some quilting cotton for applique in the past (and the mishap kept me from trying it again), and lightweight fusible web, and small perpendicular handstitches. But it eventually came apart! Both the adhesive and the stitches, because the cotton frayed. Would you have an idea of what I’m doing wrong?
    Thanks so much for sharing you knowledge with us all the time!

    • I’m really glad it helps!
      As for the stitching problem you had — it’s definitely something I’ve run into before since cotton does like to fray :/ Sometimes the culprit is that I didn’t let the adhesive fuse long enough so it didn’t get the strongest hold. But some cottons have a looser weave and will fray more readily. I find it usually helps to do a longer whip stitch and make the stitches a little closer together. A blanket stitch also helps a little too if you’re willing to try that 🙂
      I really hope that helps in the future!

  4. Thank you for posting this. I’ve seen lots of stuff referencing fusible webbing and I haven’t been able to figure out exactly what that is. Every time I think I’ve found it, I’ve been wrong. But with this post, I should be able to find the right stuff next time. Thank you.

  5. Hey! This is amazing! I’ve recently started working on much larger plushies and I think I will have to start using the applique method for eyes, My embroidery machine only fits a 5×7 so I will probably have to hand manipulate the satin stitches at least when attaching the eyes to the face. Do you have any tips for lining up the eyes so they come out evenly? and would using hooped stabilizer help or just stabilizer alone should be enough support? I am really excited to try the fusible method too! Pins are just a mess for facial features 😄 Thank you for being amazing!

    • I’m so glad you like it!
      I feel you on the size limitation on embroidery machines — I wish it wasn’t so difficult to find ones that stitch larger. But as for lining up eyes, I sometimes fuse them really quickly so the adhesive doesn’t bond that strongly — then I fold the face piece in half to see if the eyes line up. If they don’t then it’s easy to reposition them. I also like to check for symmetry by measuring the distance from the eye to the edge of the fabric on both sides.
      And I always just use one sheet of tearaway stabilizer alone beneath the project 🙂 Some like to use a water-soluble stabilizer on top, but I do fine with just the one.
      I hope that helps!

  6. Thanks so much for this!! It’s so helpful and easy to understand! I will definitely follow these steps!

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