Choly Knight

Sew Desu Ne?


8 Comments

Infographic: Sewing from the Ground Up

Hi everyone! This infographic I just finished up is on a topic that’s near and dear to my heart. I got a few fans that told me they’re excited to start sewing after seeing my free patterns. But they admit they don’t have the money to get started buying supplies, let alone a sewing machine, so they don’t know when they can start. It’s such a bummer that hit me much harder than usual because I know that feeling exactly. I personally started sewing with random supplies I found around the house and a broken old Singer.
So I thought I might share the tiny steps I went through to earn the money I needed to make sewing a serious hobby. And in the hopes to make it a little less boring, I put it in infographic form! But you can find the detailed information after the graphic. I don’t know if it will help a ton of people, but it was still freeing to get to share a little of my history with you all this way ❤

1. ASSESS WHAT YOU’VE GOT:
Lots of lists out there will give you the rundown of what every beginner sewist should have. It’s usually something like: sewing machine, thread, pins, needles, scissors, rulers/measuring tape, seam ripper, iron, fabric marker, and your fabric. Gather what you have from this list. If you have none of it, the bare minimum of what you need is:
Thread, needle, and scissors.
You can usually find sewing kits with a thread assortment, needles, and maybe some tiny scissors. Some kits are as little as $2-3 (USD). It’s not perfect, but it’ll do if you don’t have a lot of funds!
To tackle the rest seriously, you could make a list of the remaining supplies you need and their dollar amounts so you have a clear goal to aim for.
Also, I didn’t know anyone else that sewed when I got started, but if you’re lucky enough that you do, ask around! There’s a very good chance a fellow or former sewist might have some hand-me-down tools and fabric for you.

2. SAVE UP FOR THE REST:
a. Take on odd jobs:
I earned the most of sewing money through my brother, who paid me to attach punk band patches to his clothes, haha 🙂 Taking on little mending projects that people sometimes forget about is a great way to get started. This works the best if you have lots of supportive friends and family that know you’re still learning. Ask if they need any of their clothes fixed. With just thread and a needle, you can handle these sorts of jobs:
Note: I find it doesn’t hurt to ask specific questions, haha 🙂 Many people forget they have a shirt missing a button in the back of their closet, or a collection of patches they meant to add to a jacket, etc.

If you’re lucky enough to start with a sewing machine, you can tackle more difficult jobs:

If you manage to earn $5 here or $10 there for each job, that quickly adds up to lots of tools and fabric!

b. Make projects from recycled items:
If that’s not an option for you, or you want to push your skills further, you can also make items to sell from unused household items.

Items like these can be sold at craft shows, conventions, and bazaars. Or you could take the plunge and open up an online shop like on Etsy or StoreEnvy.

And from there?
Hopefully from this it might help you earn enough to get the sewing machine you wanted, or build up the fabric collection you’ve wished for! You can start buying nicer fabrics and supplies so you can make better things to sell, or just make things for yourself and fall back on these tips when you need more spending money!

Advertisements


10 Comments

Plush Sewing Basics: Working with Fleece and Minky

Hi everyone!

I’m back with another infographic, getting into the nitty gritty of working with plush fabrics. This one is about general tips and tricks for working with fabrics like fleece and minky. Fleece is generally easy to sew, but this graphic has a few pointers to make it foolproof. There are also tips for working with minky as well, which is known to be a little tricky at times. It also goes into the different types of fleece and minky out there. They’re both fabrics that are popular and trendy right now, so new variations and names are cropping up everywhere. It’s sure to confuse beginners. But I’m going to do my best to clear things up for you here 🙂

Working with Fleece & Minky Infographic


2 Comments

FAQ – Projects

1. What do I need to know (or tools do I have to have) to make these projects?
When I write patterns and instructions for the projects on my website, I’ll assume that you have the basic sewing skills mentioned in most ‘how-to’ sewing books. I’ll also assume that you have the basic sewing tools mentioned on these books, including a sewing machine.
If I mention a technique that is a little more obscure, I’ll usually write a tutorial about it so you can refer back to it 😀
However, if you’re not familiar with a technique at all, don’t hesitate to ask for more clarification! I might make it into a tutorial so it helps out lots of people!


2. What should I do if I find a problem with your project?
I make up these projects on the fly since they’re for free, so unfortunately they don’t go through a lot of testing. If you find a problem with the project, please keep that in mind, but also don’t hesitate to contact me by commenting on the project page if it’s particularly bad. Maybe there was a miscommunication and there’s something I can do to help! Either way, I appreciate your honest feedback if you feel there’s something I can improve!


3. Can I use your patterns to make projects to sell on Etsy? / Can I use your patterns commercially? / What are your terms of use?
You are more than welcome to use my patterns both personally and commercially. This includes:
Personally:
• Gifts for friends & family
• Personal projects for yourself
• Giveaways & fundraisers

Commercially:
• Making the finished project to sell online
• Making the finished project to sell at craft fairs
Do not:
• Sell the .pdf & photo instructions as your own pattern
• Make the pattern to sell if it features a copyrighted character
• Use the project and pattern for mass-production

All that I ask is that you do not sell the pattern itself for profit ^-^ People can get it free here anyway, so that would be silly! If you do use my finished project to sell online, I would greatly appreciate if you could credit me in your listing. A simple link to http://www.cholyknight.com is fine, just as a way of saying thanks.


4. How do I put together your paper patterns?
Easy! I have a whole tutorial set up here!